White House dismiss data predicting surge in COVID19 deaths in US

The United States death toll from the COVID19 was nearly 70,000 on Tuesday, and there were more than 1.2 million confirmed COVID19 cases.


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White House dismiss data predicting surge in COVID19 deaths in US

Mr President Donald Trump and White House on Tuesday rejected a report suggesting the daily United Statess death toll due to COVID19 could reach 3,000 in June.

The United States death toll from the COVID19 was nearly 70,000 on Tuesday, and there were more than 1.2 million confirmed COVID19 cases.

However, some states have started revealing flattening of the curve decline in new COVID19 cases and death rates. As a result, several state have announced several plans to re-open their economy in a phased manner.

In it's report Johns Hopkins University projected new COVID19 cases in the US reaching 200,000 daily by June 1 and fatalities nearly 3000.

These Projections are with no mitigation. We are doing mitigation, Mr President told reporters before boarding Air Force One at Joint Base Andrews on his way to Arizona.

In the statement, Kayleigh McEnany white house press secretary said that the Johns Hopkins' study being pushed around by the media as factual is based on faulty assumptions and is in no way indicative of any federal government projections.

Johns Hopins University in a separate statement said that the research conducted by it for Federal Emergency Management Agencywas to assist in planning for various scenarios and was not be used for the official forecast.

The New York Times was first reported about it on Monday.

As mentioned by Johns Hopkins, it should not be taken as a forecast, McEnany said.

That Research considered zero mitigation, meaning it was conducted as though no federal guidelines were in place, no expansion of testing, no contract tracing, while removing all shelter in place agreementss laid out in the phased approach of the Opening Up America Again guidelines for individuals with co-morbidities, she said.

The media should be more responsible in its reporting and should provide the full set of information to the American Public, McEnany said.

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